Expressing an Opinion

November 19, 2017

Students that have graduated high school have the freedom to choose whether to continue to a higher education or not. It would be one of the biggest decision that a person would make in their life. Whether to invest in education that would take years to pay off or take a shot to a world with very less experience. Risk varies through the different situation in each student’s life and environment. From my experience, after I have graduated high school I have decided to take a step back from school and decided to learn what I am strongly interested in. In my case the decision that I have made paid off in many ways, which I believe many of the people that have made the same decision may say the same thing. I am grateful to online education providing this kind of online learning education, helping thousands of people just like me. It is not a bad decision to wait a year or two to go to college.

Value of an College Degree

Every student has each of their own situation that they would need to adjust to their course of a decision to begin attending college. Either that would be a financial hardship, family relationship, relationships, physical difficulty, or taking a time away, whichever option I would have, it is not required to have a college degree. “Data show that the average hourly wage for a college graduates rose slightly to about $323.60 over the last decade, double the wage for everyone else” (Hartocollis, 2016). Students attain a college degree for most of the reason to have better opportunities in the future and compete in the global economy.

It would certainly be a better choice if you have a brain of a genius or a great football player, not to go to college and go straight to employment or start a business. There has become more common that companies hire employees straight to students in high school and even in middle school. Potential found in the gifted already have great value but what about for an average or for people with less? I imagined in the past that there were be certainly more competition but from my experience, since the great advance in technology and the ever-growing global market, I find that there are more than this global economy can provide. “What’s even worse is that students are heading to college to “find themselves”, wasting time and money trying to figure out what they want to do in life.” (Farrington, 2014). There is no wrong answer to this question to whether it is better to go to college but I find that there is greater value in how to apply the college education to the final goal.

Seeking for Future Goals and Dreams

In my case, I grew up in an international community and I imagined the world would become more multicultural and competitive. I did not have any support in my decision to go to college, however, I did have enough saving from working part-time during high school. I decided to attend a community college in Los Angeles, CA, to explore options that I have for my future. For a year, I explore different majors and opportunity there was available. Although at the time nothing struck my interest. In my first year of college, after graduating high school, I was not able to figure out what I would like to pursue through in my career. I dropped out and decided to seek for my answer myself to Taipei, Taiwan. I found a full-time job opportunity at a desk job and various occupation including a translator and a general management. Through working and discovering different careers, I found that my childhood interest and skills in computers actually had great value to many companies.

Taking Action

I decided to enhance my skill, which I have first put my eyes on communication technology, which have made a significant impact on our modern global economy. I started off by studying networking on my own since networking is the baseline of computing technology and the technology itself improved but did not change for decades. It had fundamental long-term value in learning networking at the time. I then found an opportunity which got me a job at the largest known telecommunication company in Japan as a service manager. I manage high priority customers with dedicated network circuits and propose customer IT supervisor solutions and countermeasures to ensure a high level of service quality, more like solution engineering. More as I learn, I wanted to learn more about the world of information technology in depth.

I knew at this point where to go, and it is to go back to California but a little bit to the north this time. I found a job opportunity in the Silicon Valley, CA as a system engineer to proceed in learning computer technology at its very birthplace. Now that I am certain what I would like to achieve in the future and know exactly the type of education I need. Until this point of time, I was never comfortable with making a decision to drop a couple hundred thousand dollars and choosing my future career at that time of that age. If I was to choose a major at that time, I would have chosen a major that I had no interest to and I am happy that I have chosen to seek what I really like to do in the future. I enjoy a lot, learning new computer technology and for me, this decision has benefited me in every aspect of my life. Now I am ready.

Conclusion

Through the lesson that this world has taught me, a college education is not required to achieve your goals. It depends on what you would like to achieve and it would only have value for how you use the diploma. I find that finding what you are interested and looking for future goals help put value in a college education and help students achieve stronger in the future. I am truly thankful for online education to have this great online learning program that benefits thousands of people just like me. It allows us to feel confident in the decision we have made to not rush to finish college.

References

Farrington, R. (2014). A College Degree Is The New High School Diploma, Retrieved from

https://www.forbes.com/sites/robertfarrington/2014/09/29/a-college-degree-is-the-new-

high-school-diploma/#6abbfe624b44

Hartocollis, A. (2016). What is College Education Worth? Retrieved from

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/cp/national/college-applications/what-isa-

college-education-worth

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